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Tisha


[A Quick Note: I read this book a very long time agoโ€ฆmaybe 15 years? It was given to me by my mother, who had the foresight to ensure my sisters and I read some serious books amidst all our fantasy reads. And this one was very informative for a younger mind. Coming back to it as an adult, I got even more out of itโ€ฆ]

โ€œ๐๐ž๐จ๐ฉ๐ฅ๐ž ๐ ๐ž๐ญ ๐š๐ฌ ๐ฆ๐ž๐š๐ง ๐š๐ฌ ๐ญ๐ก๐ž ๐ฐ๐ž๐š๐ญ๐ก๐ž๐ซ, ๐›๐ฎ๐ญ ๐ญ๐ก๐ž๐ฒ ๐ฐ๐ž๐ซ๐ž ๐š๐ฅ๐ฌ๐จ ๐œ๐š๐ฉ๐š๐›๐ฅ๐ž ๐จ๐Ÿ ๐ ๐ซ๐ž๐š๐ญ ๐ ๐จ๐จ๐.โ€โ€”Robert Specht

Tisha is the true story of a young schoolteacher, Anne Hobbs, in the 1920s, who ventures into the Alaskan wilderness, to the small town of Chicken, to run a school. It illustrates the hardships she faced both in the unforgivable environment, and with the people themselves. It was heartwarming and heartbreaking. Mostly, it was eye-opening and instructive. Anne was threatened, mistreated, and scorned for doing what was right, for allowing Indian school children into her school house, and for falling in love with a half white/half Inuit man, yet, she prevailed and continued fighting.

I loved this book; it was my second time reading it. I read it back in high school, and it was impactful then, but it was more impactful now. Anne is nineteen when she leaves the states in search of adventure. Sheโ€™s called to teach in the Alaskan wilderness, during a time of monumental change in Alaska. Itโ€™s very much Americaโ€™s final frontier, and thereโ€™s a huge gold rush boom. What Anne discovers is the brutal life led by both the immigrants and natives, and the deep prejudices harbored.


I loved Anneโ€™s pure heart. She doesnโ€™t care about a childโ€™s skin color; everyone has a right to an education. She opens her schoolroom for native Inuit children and sheโ€™s punished for it. The people of Chicken donโ€™t agree with her, and they donโ€™t want their white children in the same room as โ€œsavages.โ€ Seeing how deep these prejudices were, was often very hard to read. The Alaskan wilderness is unforgivable, and losing the support of her small town became a life or death situation, in a place where temperatures drop to 50 below. Yet, Anne never compromises on what is right.

โ€œ๐“๐ก๐ž ๐ฌ๐ฎ๐ง ๐ฐ๐š๐ฌ ๐ฃ๐ฎ๐ฌ๐ญ ๐œ๐จ๐ฆ๐ข๐ง๐  ๐ฎ๐ฉ ๐จ๐ฏ๐ž๐ซ ๐ญ๐ก๐ž ๐ฆ๐จ๐ฎ๐ง๐ญ๐š๐ข๐ง๐ฌ--๐›๐ฅ๐จ๐จ๐ ๐ซ๐ž๐ ๐š๐ง๐ ๐œ๐จ๐ฅ๐. ๐ˆ ๐Ÿ๐ž๐ฅ๐ญ ๐š๐ฌ ๐ข๐Ÿ ๐ˆ ๐ฐ๐š๐ฌ ๐ฌ๐ญ๐š๐ง๐๐ข๐ง๐  ๐ข๐ง ๐ญ๐ก๐ž ๐ฆ๐ข๐ ๐ก๐ญ๐ข๐ž๐ฌ๐ญ ๐œ๐š๐ญ๐ก๐ž๐๐ซ๐š๐ฅ ๐ญ๐ก๐š๐ญ ๐ก๐š๐ ๐ž๐ฏ๐ž๐ซ ๐›๐ž๐ž๐ง ๐›๐ฎ๐ข๐ฅ๐ญ. ๐“๐ก๐ž๐ซ๐ž ๐ฐ๐š๐ฌ ๐ง๐จ ๐ž๐ง๐ ๐ญ๐จ ๐ข๐ญ, ๐š๐ง๐ ๐ง๐จ ๐›๐ž๐ ๐ข๐ง๐ง๐ข๐ง๐ . ๐€๐ฅ๐ฅ ๐ˆ ๐œ๐จ๐ฎ๐ฅ๐ ๐๐จ ๐ฐ๐š๐ฌ ๐ฅ๐จ๐จ๐ค ๐š๐ญ ๐ข๐ญ ๐š๐ง๐ ๐ฐ๐จ๐ซ๐ฌ๐ก๐ข๐ฉ.โ€ โ€”Robert Specht

There was a heavy sense of helplessness throughout the story. Anne is a petite, nineteen year old woman facing off against some really mean people who could seriously harm her. Sheโ€™s mistreated for doing whatโ€™s right. And when she begins to fall in love with a half white/half inuit man, sheโ€™s threatened, even shunned. This was often difficult to read.


But, there are some extremely heart warming events in this book, too. Especially between Anne and her school children. Those moments made the book easier to stomach.


It claims to be a โ€œlove storyโ€ and while there is a love story present, itโ€™s not the center of Anneโ€™s story. Thereโ€™s so much more to it than that. This book gives a real look at the harsh aspects of frontier life. The way people โ€œsurvivedโ€ and how hard they had to be. It also illustrated the consequences of the white man on the Indian people, and how destructive the white man was to their culture:


โ€œ๐“๐ก๐š๐ญ ๐ˆ๐ง๐๐ข๐š๐ง ๐ฐ๐š๐ฌ ๐ฌ๐ญ๐ฎ๐œ๐ค. ๐…๐ซ๐จ๐ฆ ๐ฅ๐ข๐ฏ๐ข๐ง๐  ๐ข๐ง ๐จ๐ง๐ž ๐ฉ๐ฅ๐š๐œ๐ž ๐š๐ง๐ ๐ž๐š๐ญ๐ข๐ง๐  ๐ญ๐ก๐ž ๐ฐ๐ก๐ข๐ญ๐ž ๐ฆ๐š๐งโ€™๐ฌ ๐Ÿ๐จ๐จ๐, ๐ก๐žโ€™๐ ๐ ๐จ๐ญ๐ญ๐ž๐ง ๐ฐ๐ž๐š๐ค. ๐…๐ฅ๐จ๐ฎ๐ซ, ๐ฌ๐ฎ๐ ๐š๐ซ, ๐›๐ข๐ฌ๐œ๐ฎ๐ข๐ญ๐ฌโ€”๐ง๐จ๐ง๐ž ๐จ๐Ÿ ๐ญ๐ก๐š๐ญ ๐ฌ๐ญ๐ฎ๐Ÿ๐Ÿ ๐œ๐š๐ง ๐ค๐ž๐ž๐ฉ ๐ฒ๐จ๐ฎ ๐ ๐จ๐ข๐ง๐  ๐Ÿ๐จ๐ซ ๐ฅ๐จ๐ง๐ . ๐˜๐จ๐ฎ ๐ง๐ž๐ž๐ ๐ฆ๐ž๐š๐ญ ๐ข๐ง ๐ญ๐ก๐ž ๐ฐ๐ข๐ง๐ญ๐ž๐ซ, ๐ ๐จ๐จ๐ ๐Ÿ๐ซ๐ž๐ฌ๐ก ๐ฆ๐ž๐š๐ญ ๐ฐ๐ข๐ญ๐ก ๐ฉ๐ฅ๐ž๐ง๐ญ๐ฒ ๐จ๐Ÿ ๐Ÿ๐š๐ญ ๐จ๐ง ๐ข๐ญ. ๐๐ฎ๐ญ ๐ญ๐ก๐ž๐ซ๐ž ๐ฐ๐š๐ฌ๐งโ€™๐ญ ๐š๐ง๐ฒ ๐ฆ๐ž๐š๐ญ ๐š๐ซ๐จ๐ฎ๐ง๐, ๐š๐ญ ๐ฅ๐ž๐š๐ฌ๐ญ ๐ง๐จ๐ญ ๐ง๐ž๐š๐ซ๐›๐ฒ. ๐“๐ก๐ž ๐ฐ๐ก๐ข๐ญ๐ž ๐ฆ๐š๐ง ๐ก๐š๐ ๐œ๐ก๐š๐ฌ๐ž๐ ๐ข๐ญ ๐š๐ฐ๐š๐ฒ ๐š๐ง๐ ๐ญ๐ก๐ž ๐ˆ๐ง๐๐ข๐š๐ง, ๐ง๐จ๐ญ ๐›๐ž๐ข๐ง๐  ๐š ๐ก๐ฎ๐ง๐ญ๐ž๐ซ ๐š๐ง๐ฒ๐ฆ๐จ๐ซ๐ž, ๐๐ข๐๐งโ€™๐ญ ๐ก๐š๐ฏ๐ž ๐ญ๐ก๐ž ๐ฌ๐ญ๐ซ๐ž๐ง๐ ๐ญ๐ก ๐ญ๐จ ๐ ๐จ ๐š๐ง๐ฒ ๐ฅ๐จ๐ง๐  ๐๐ข๐ฌ๐ญ๐š๐ง๐œ๐ž ๐Ÿ๐จ๐ซ ๐ข๐ญ.โ€ โ€”Robert Specht

I donโ€™t normally go for memoirs/biographies. This is written really well, reads like a genuine novel, and transports you to a different time, a different world, a different way of life. Highly recommend for people of all ages, even if you donโ€™t normally enjoy biographies (I sure donโ€™t, normally!)


๐Œ๐˜ ๐‘๐€๐“๐ˆ๐๐†: ๐Ÿ“/๐Ÿ“โญ๏ธ

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